Articles Tagged with Digital Assets

When I first started practicing law digital assets did not exist. Now many of us consider digital assets indispensable since they make up a large portion of the record of our lives. Digital Assets are, of course, all of the things we store on the web; social media pages such as facebook, photos, videos, personal and business documents, personal and business websites, e-mails and even text messages. So what happens to all of this when a person dies? Does it all pass to the decedent’s heirs? Until just recently, these questions were answered by the website’s Terms of Service Agreements. These are the long documents in legalese that a prospective user must accept as a condition of using the site. Most of us are guilty of simply clicking the “accept” button without reading any of it. But these agreements supersede a decedent’s will or trust and can create hardship.

In 2016 Arizona changed this and brought predictability to the disposition of digital assets by enacting the Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act (FADAA).   The new law became effective on August 8, 2016 and provides that you can now pass your digital assets to your heirs or beneficiaries by your will, trust, power of attorney, notarized written statement or by using a website’s online tool provided for this purpose, if one exists. Not only can you now pass your digital assets via your estate planning documents, you can also specify that access to certain digital assets is to be withheld and the content deleted.   The complete text of the new law can be found at A.R.S. §14-13101 through A.R.S. §14-13118.

To take advantage of the new law we recommend that you consider amending estate planning documents to give instructions for the disposition of your digital assets. If you use an online tool to give such instructions, you need to know that your online instructions will supersede any instructions given in your will or trust. It works like a Payable on Death account which passes the account balance to the listed beneficiary despite the existence of a will or trust.   We also recommend that you provide your attorney or other trusted individual with a current listing of the online accounts and websites used by you with the log in and password information for each.