Articles Tagged with decedent

Proceedings in the Superior Court to contest a will or trust are relatively uncommon. This is very good because these proceedings can be hotly and emotionally contested. The damage done can alienate family members for decades. In some cases, the damage can never be repaired.

Sometimes Will or Trust contests arise when the Will or Trust document is claimed to be defective in some way. The Court must determine if the document is legally sufficient and, if so, what it’s terms are.   Many times, however, the Will or Trust does comply with legal requirements but it is claimed that the document does not accurately reflect the decedent’s wishes due to the decedent’s lack of capacity or due to undue influence exerted over the decedent by another person. These cases are often more difficult. A few of the circumstances that might lead to a contest of a decedent’s estate plan are:

  1. Where heirs who normally would inherit have been omitted.

When trying to figure out whether an Arizona probate estate is required, the Phoenix probate attorneys at Platt & Westby, P.C. suggest that it is often helpful to look at the decedent’s assets (especially how they are titled) and the decedent’s debts.

The manner in which decedent held title to his/her various assets makes a big difference. Real estate can be held in a variety of ways including solely and separately, joint tenancy, community property, and as tenants in common. Often the joint tenancy and community property titling is coupled with “right of survivorship” language. This additional language means that when a property is held by two or more persons, the surviving persons receive the deceased person’s share of the property automatically at the time the deceased person passes. This happens without the need for probate. On the other hand, property held solely and separately, or as tenants in common usually require a probate in order to transfer title or to sell the property. Similar to the manner in which title is held, it also depends what name the property is titled in. In the event that the decedent titled his/her real estate into a trust, a probate will be unnecessary. Instead, the trustee or successor trustee as the case may be, can usually proceed to administer the trust without court proceedings.

Bank accounts can be a little tricky because you have to distinguish whether a person associated with the account is an owner, a signer, or a beneficiary. Jointly owned accounts will normally pass to the surviving person automatically without the need for a probate. When the account is owned only by the decedent, and there is a surviving person who is only a signer on the account (or acting as an agent under a power of attorney on the account), then the signer/agent will not have access to the funds upon the owner’s death. Instead, it will have to be determined whether the account has another surviving owner or had a beneficiary designation on it. If there is a surviving joint owner, that person will likely own the funds remaining in the account and will have continuing access to them without anything further. If there is no surviving joint owner, then the next step is to determine if there is a beneficiary to the account. These beneficiary designations are often referred to as TOD (transfer on death) or POD (payable on death) designations. Essentially, these POD/TOD designations work just like a beneficiary designation on a life insurance policy. In order to obtain the funds in the decedent’s account where a valid POD/TOD exists, the person entitled to the funds applies to the bank institution for the funds, proving who they are and providing information about the decedent’s passing. In most cases, these kinds of designations will permit distribution of the funds without opening a probate proceeding. An example where such a designation would not work is when the beneficiary passed away before the owner of the account dies and the owner did not update the POD/TOD designations. In that case, a probate would need to be opened up to collect the funds, to determine who gets the funds, and to distribute them to the person(s) entitled to them.

If there is no will, does all the decedent’s property go to the State of Arizona? What happens?   This is a question that is asked frequently. Fortunately, in Arizona, property of a decedent rarely goes to the state. Our statutes provide for a wide pool of family members who are potential heirs.

ARS §14-2102 gives preference to a surviving spouse who normally inherits the entire estate provided that any children are the issue of both the decedent and the surviving spouse. Where there are children from a different relationship, the estate is divided between the surviving spouse and the children.

ARS §14-2103 determines what happens if there is no surviving spouse. In that event, a decedent’s estate is distributed as follows: