Articles Posted in Estate Planning

What is a Trust?

A Trust, like a will, is a written document that governs what happens to certain property when a person passes away. Unlike a will though, Trusts can also be used for providing for a person’s needs while they are still alive.  There are many different types of Trusts, trusts can be simple or complex, they can be used to shield beneficiaries from creditors, they can be  used for charitable purposes, trusts can even be set up to care for your pets.  However, for the purposes of this article, we will be discussing a basic Revocable Living Trust.  This type of trust allows a person to retain control over all of the assets in the trust and to make changes to the trust at any time.  The requirements for creating a trust are governed by Arizona Revised Statute §14-10402.  Generally, in order to create a trust, a person must have the capacity to create a trust, the intent to create a trust, the trust must have a beneficiary, the trustee must have duties and the same person cannot be the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary.

Does a Trust affect all my assets?

What is a will?

A will is a written document that governs what happens to certain property when a person passes away. A will is the most basic estate planning instrument one can utilize. In Arizona wills are governed by statute.  Arizona Revised Statute §14-2501 governs who can create a will.  Generally, any person over the age of 18 who is of sound mind and body can create a will.  Arizona Revised Statute §14-2502 sets forth the general requirements of a valid will.  The basics require that a will must be in writing, signed, and witnessed by at least two other people.  A will usually also appoints one or more people to serve as personal representative of the decedent’s estate.  A personal representative is the individual who will be responsible for distributing the estate according to the terms of the will. A personal representative has certain powers and obligations to the estate and the beneficiaries.  These duties are also governed by statute beginning with Arizona Revised Statute §14-3701.

Does a will affect all assets?

The baby boomer generation is aging. Many have no one to appropriately care for them as their capacities diminish.   They often become vulnerable due to age or illness.   This makes them targets for the unscrupulous.  Unfortunately, many times the unscrupulous individuals who prey upon the elderly turn out to be family members.    By the time abuse happens, the victim has often become isolated and dependent.   He or she cannot help themselves and a victim may not even recognize the situation as abusive.

So, what can you do to protect yourself while you are still able? Here are some thoughts:

  1. Don’t wait to make your plans. Act while you are still competent and active.

Estate planning documents are designed to help and provide for families at a critical time, usually upon the death or incapacity of a family member. The typical estate plan focuses on financial needs. But religious needs and the communication of religious values are also important to many of us. Your estate planning documents can be an effective means to communicate your religious and cultural values to those close to you.   This can be done in any number of ways. A few of these might be:

  1. Giving instructions to a trustee that money be provided for religious education, religious travel or a program of charitable giving.
  2. Giving instructions to a trustee to adhere to religious principals in investing estate funds.

Proceedings in the Superior Court to contest a will or trust are relatively uncommon. This is very good because these proceedings can be hotly and emotionally contested. The damage done can alienate family members for decades. In some cases, the damage can never be repaired.

Sometimes Will or Trust contests arise when the Will or Trust document is claimed to be defective in some way. The Court must determine if the document is legally sufficient and, if so, what it’s terms are.   Many times, however, the Will or Trust does comply with legal requirements but it is claimed that the document does not accurately reflect the decedent’s wishes due to the decedent’s lack of capacity or due to undue influence exerted over the decedent by another person. These cases are often more difficult. A few of the circumstances that might lead to a contest of a decedent’s estate plan are:

  1. Where heirs who normally would inherit have been omitted.

As we age it is foreseeable that our abilities and mental functioning will degrade. Many of us will need some type of assistance later in life. Often, the assistance needed is with finances and payment of bills.

Since we know that this need is likely to arise, it makes sense to plan for it in advance instead of simply hoping for the best.

Having a plan in place to deal with future incapacity is the best way to protect against the loss or misuse of your funds. In most cases, the financial abuser/exploiter is a family member or other person known to you. By the time help is needed, you are no longer able to protect yourself.

A Life Estate is an interest in real property that terminates upon the death of a specified person, usually the owner of the Life Estate. There are some terms that are unique to life estates. The owner of a life estate is often called a “life tenant.” The life tenant has the right to reside in the home for life or for so long as he or she may choose. Upon the termination of the life estate the persons who obtain full fee simple ownership of the real property are called “remaindermen.” A life tenant may live in the property but cannot sell it without the consent of the remaindermen.   A life tenant must respect the property and do nothing that would decrease its value.

A life Estate is usually created by use of a deed that specifically reserves the life estate. The deed also can specify the conditions upon which the life estate is granted. A life tenant may have the responsibility for maintenance, taxes, insurance and other costs connected with the property for so long as he or she resides there.

One benefit of a life estate is that it allows a person—often an elderly person—to sell their home (usually to a family member), generate cash to live on and still reside in the home for life.

When I first started practicing law digital assets did not exist. Now many of us consider digital assets indispensable since they make up a large portion of the record of our lives. Digital Assets are, of course, all of the things we store on the web; social media pages such as facebook, photos, videos, personal and business documents, personal and business websites, e-mails and even text messages. So what happens to all of this when a person dies? Does it all pass to the decedent’s heirs? Until just recently, these questions were answered by the website’s Terms of Service Agreements. These are the long documents in legalese that a prospective user must accept as a condition of using the site. Most of us are guilty of simply clicking the “accept” button without reading any of it. But these agreements supersede a decedent’s will or trust and can create hardship.

In 2016 Arizona changed this and brought predictability to the disposition of digital assets by enacting the Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act (FADAA).   The new law became effective on August 8, 2016 and provides that you can now pass your digital assets to your heirs or beneficiaries by your will, trust, power of attorney, notarized written statement or by using a website’s online tool provided for this purpose, if one exists. Not only can you now pass your digital assets via your estate planning documents, you can also specify that access to certain digital assets is to be withheld and the content deleted.   The complete text of the new law can be found at A.R.S. §14-13101 through A.R.S. §14-13118.

To take advantage of the new law we recommend that you consider amending estate planning documents to give instructions for the disposition of your digital assets. If you use an online tool to give such instructions, you need to know that your online instructions will supersede any instructions given in your will or trust. It works like a Payable on Death account which passes the account balance to the listed beneficiary despite the existence of a will or trust.   We also recommend that you provide your attorney or other trusted individual with a current listing of the online accounts and websites used by you with the log in and password information for each.

A Living Will is different from a normal Will.   A Will is a common estate planning document that controls the distribution of a person’s property after he or she dies. It is not effective until death. A living will, however, is effective during a person’s lifetime and serves a wholly different purpose.   Also known as an “advance directive” a living will allows a person, in advance, to give written instructions for medical treatment should he or she become terminally ill and be unable to communicate with a physician or family member. Most states have laws authorizing living wills/advance directives. Arizona’s statutes are found at A.R.S. §36-3201, et.seq. A sample Living Will can be found in A.R.S. §36-3262.

Medical care has become so good that life can be extended artificially for long periods. Physicians often opt to extend life where possible, but this may not be what a patient wants. Few of us want our lives to be artificially extended where we are terminally ill with no chance of recovery. Most want to be allowed to die with some dignity.   This is where a living will comes in.

A Living Will provides a means to control the medical procedures provided to you at a time when you cannot speak for yourself.   In most cases, this amounts to a description of what services are not wanted in the event of a terminal illness. Often, people opt for “comfort care” with instructions that they are to be medicated to be free from pain but other life extending procedures such as feeding tubes, blood transfusions, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and similar services are rejected. In other cases, patients may wish to preserve life as long as possible using current technology. A Living Will can also be drafted with this goal in mind.

Your Will is an essential estate planning document. However, it covers only those assets that make up your probate estate. There are other assets called non-probate assets and your Will does not control these. Your Phoenix estate planning lawyer needs to know about both types of assets when preparing an estate plan.

Non-probate assets are normally those for which you have already designated a beneficiary upon your death. These are often:

  1. Life Insurance policies,